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Camille Styles

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What Really Happens to Your Brain When You’re Hungover

April 2nd, 2018

The Sunday Scaries. Hangxiety. No matter what you call it, we’ve all been there. Your head is throbbing, you can’t even figure out how to navigate your Favor app (which is further complicated by the fact your eyes are welling up with tears from that stupid Hallmark movie on tv.) All this begs the question: what’s really happening in our brains after a night of one-too-many drinks?

I did some investigating on the topic and found out that the answer is a complex one. Depending on your genetics, gender, weight, and how much alcohol you consumed, our hangover symptoms (and their severity) can vary widely. That said, there are certain universal truths that reflect the way alcohol affects our brains the morning after.

The cool part is that hangovers really do serve a biological purpose — they’re our bodies way of telling us to chill the F out on drinking. So the next time you’re struggling through an intense, soul-destroying day on the bathroom floor, take comfort in the scientific facts listed below, and remember:

This too shall pass.

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  1. […] The Sunday Scaries. Hangxiety. It doesn’t matter what you name it, we’ve all been there. Your head is throbbing, you may’t even determine methods to navigate your Favor app (which is additional difficult by the actual fact your eyes are welling up with tears from that silly Hallmark film on television.) All this begs the query: what’s actually occurring in our brains after an evening of one-too-many drinks? I did some investigating on the subject and came upon that the reply is a posh one. Relying in your genetics, gender, weight, and the way a lot alcohol you consumed, our hangover signs (and their severity) can fluctuate broadly. That mentioned, there are particular common truths that replicate the way in which alcohol impacts our brains the morning after. The cool half is that hangovers actually do serve a organic function — they’re our our bodies approach of telling us to sit back the F out on ingesting. …see the slideshow here […]

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