By 2021, we know the positive power of houseplants extends well beyond looks alone. The presence of something green in your home has been shown to lower blood pressure, raise productivity, and improve attentiveness. To put it plainly: plants just make you feel better. Never has that been more apparent than during a past year spent largely indoors. And though the “it” plant of the moment is forever evolving (from the trendy, temperamental fiddle leaf fig to the low-maintenance olive tree), the pandemic has cultivated a whole new wave of new houseplant obsessives, all of whom are now ready to invest in flora that will look just as good on a windowsill as it does on Instagram. So that begs us to ask the question: what are the most popular houseplants of 2021? 

Fortunately, Lonny teamed up with the experts at Plant Kween, Planting With P, and online plant delivery service The Sill to name the top 15 houseplants of the year.

Our fiddle leafed friend holds down its must-have designation another year, but there are a few less well-known plant names to discover.

We rounded up a selection of their most interesting choices, from an expensive “princess” that justifies its hefty price tag to a sturdy gem that inspires. Visit Lonny.com for their full 2021 houseplant breakdown and where to shop them online, then scroll below to see our picks for the most notable new discoveries.

To Brighten Up Dark Corners: Hoyas 

If you follow any pretty plant shops on Instagram, you’ve definitely come across hoyas. The waxy, shell-like foliage cascades beautifully whether hung up along a wall or positioned on your windowsill and creates some gorgeous—and gorgeous smelling—flowers when allowed the chance to bloom.

Despite their sturdy-looking nature, Christopher Griffin of Plant Kween warns not to think of them as succulents. Most hoyas do best in indirect sunlight with well-draining soil.

For Those Who Prefer a Hands-Off Houseplant Approach in 2021: Monstera Delicioso

Lovingly termed the “Swiss-cheese plant,” this hole-flecked beauty has been gaining popularity for some time now, and for good reason. The buoyant leaves know how to spread out and make a statement. And though they’re native to the rainforests of Southern Mexico, Monstera plants do remarkably well in indirect indoor light and require very little water.

For reference, I once went on a trip and left my beloved “Swiss-cheese plant” waterless and abandoned for weeks. (It was an accident I swear.) When I returned home, she looked remarkably good — just a tiny bit thirsty.  

For the DIY Lover: Avocado Tree

If you’re looking to graduate beyond simply keeping your plant alive and thriving, growing an avocado tree from the pit offers a welcome challenge. Just clean the pit, wrap it in a damp paper towel, and slip it into a zip-top bag for a few weeks until you notice a root cracking its way through. When the root grows to three inches, it’s ready to plant.

The best part: once it’s potted, an avocado tree is as easy to grow as it is cool to look at.

For a Houseplant That Inspires: ZZ Plant

Beyond simply adding to your general well-being, plants can also inspire. That’s certainly the case with this ZZ Plant, whose sturdy leaves are packed with chlorophyll and require little light. Let her durability in the face of darkness offer motivation to us all.   

For the Aesthete: Pink Princess Philodendron

We love our green friends dearly, but if you want to add a little color into the mix, the Pink Princess Philodendron is a notable stunner. Her man-made nature makes her a little pricier than your average houseplant (Lonny’s suggests a pink princess on Etsy for $295), but the bragging rights allotted to those who score a rare it plant of 2021 should certainly be considered. 

Visit Lonny.com for their full 2021 houseplant breakdown.

5 comments
  1. 1
    Dawn H | June 2, 2021 at 12:12 am

    Most hoyas require bright light either using LEDs (or some artificial source that mimics the sun or has grow wavelengths) or in a window that’s not in direct sunlight. Dark corners may be OK for a few types of hoyas but the multicolored ones need the light to show those off….else they go green and lose their vibrancy. I also DIY use my own mix and they’re all growing like weeds!

    Reply
  2. 2
    Mirla | June 2, 2021 at 7:59 am

    Love this plants

    Reply
  3. 3
    Jessica | June 2, 2021 at 1:29 pm

    Its monstera deliciosA, and its not a philodendron at all, monstera is a genus of its own ?

    Reply
  4. 4
    Justin | June 3, 2021 at 12:33 pm

    My rubber plants (like the one prominently shown at the top of the cover image) protests for being overlooked in this list.

    Reply
  5. 5
    Tina Woolery | June 9, 2021 at 10:11 pm

    Would like to know more about the “mother Tongue plant. Thanx

    Reply
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